top of page

Remote learning support

Pubblico·23 membri
Demian Rusakov
Demian Rusakov

Daniel Castro - I'll Play The Blues For You LINK


Album: No SurrenderReleased: 1999If you're down and out and you feel real hurtCome on over to the place where I workAnd all your loneliness I'll try to sootheI'll play the Blues for youDon't be afraid come on inYou might run across some of your old friendsAll your loneliness I gotta sootheI'll play the blues for youI got no big name and I ain't no big starI play the blues for you on my guitarAll your loneliness I'll try to sootheI 'll play the blues for you




Daniel Castro - I'll Play The Blues For You



Here you can learn the song " I'll play the blues for you " by Daniel Castro. It's an original by Albert King and got covered by many artists like Joe Bonamassa, Gary Moore and many others. I liked the version of Daniel Castro a lot and in this tutorial I am referring to his version when I show you the guitar intro and the rhythm guitar. In the second part of this tutorial I am talking about minor blues improvisation in specific. About how to create a great guitar solo in a minor blues.


Daniel Castro - I'll Play The Blues For YouVerse 1 If you're down and out, and you hurt real good Come on over to the place I work And all your loneliness, I'll try to soothe I'll play the blues for


The Blues is a journey. Through playing blues, I have been fortunate enough to travel and experience other cultures. Their languages and lifestyles are different, but the music hits them the same. Blues counterculture speaks to other cultures because all people groups want change and all people groups want to feel something. The Blues does that.


"The Blues is a journey. Through playing blues, I have been fortunate enough to travel and experience other cultures. Their languages and lifestyles are different, but the music hits them the same. Blues counterculture speaks to other cultures because all people groups want change and all people groups want to feel something. The Blues does that." (Daniel Castro / Photo by Bob Hakins)


Castro began playing guitar at the age of 10 and was influenced and inspired by electric blues, Chicago blues, West Coast blues, soul music, 1960s rock and roll and Southern rock. His style has always been a hybrid of all his favorite genres. He names Mike Bloomfield, Elvin Bishop, Eric Clapton, B.B. King, Buddy Guy, Elmore James and Freddie King as guitar influences and Ray Charles, Wilson Pickett and James Brown as vocal influences.


In 2011, Castro stripped down his band to a four-piece unit called the Painkillers with bassist Randy McDonald from the original Tommy Castro Band, keyboardist James Pace and original Painkillers drummer Byron Cage. 2013's The Devil You Know, was recorded with this line-up plus guest appearances by Marcia Ball, Tab Benoit, Joe Bonamassa, The Holmes Brothers, and Magic Dick.[9] The album was reviewed by Allmusic.com, saying "Castro brings fiery garage energy to everything. His guitar playing is fired up and roaring with a renewed sharpness that keeps the pot boiling. His voice is a soulful and versatile blue-collar growl. This album is full of the blues, but it's also like a full-charged blue-eyed R&B and soul review, making this one of Castro's finest releases."[10]


Neither did any playwright or Broadway musical creator. Which seems only typical after the complete lack of actors. Yes, George Gershwin is included but that's mostly for his boundary-breaking with jazz and classical music. In other words, the Broadway musical may be as distinctively an American creation as jazz or rock or the comic book or blues or gospel, but Rodgers and Hart, Rodgers and Hammerstein, Jerome Kern, Cole Porter, Frank Loesser and Stephen Sondheim didn't rate. Hell, as the saying goes, Irving Berlin is the American songbook, and he's not even here. 041b061a72


Info

Welcome to the group! You can connect with other members, ge...

Membri

  • Adnan Shah
    Adnan Shah
  • Hermiane Cielle
    Hermiane Cielle
  • Andrey Boarskij
    Andrey Boarskij
  • Janet Gee
    Janet Gee
bottom of page